Catherine Bush

About

Catherine Bush is the author of four novels. Her work has been critically acclaimed, published internationally and shortlisted for literary awards. Accusation (Goose Lane Editions, 2013) was one of NOW magazine’s Best Ten Books of 2013, an Amazon.ca Best Book and a Canada Reads Top 40 pick. Minus Time (HarperCollins,1993), her first novel, was shortlisted for the Books in Canada/SmithBooks First Novel Award and the City of Toronto Book Award. Her second novel, The Rules of Engagement (HarperCollins, 2000) was a national bestseller and chosen as a New York Times Notable Book and one of the Globe and Mail’s Best Books of the Year. Her third novel, Claire’s Head (McClelland & Stewart, 2004), was shortlisted for Ontario’s Trillium Award and was a Globe Best Book of the Year.

Bush’s fiction, praised for its intelligence and daring, often plumbs moral quandaries in which the public and private lives of its characters collide. Accusation follows a journalist’s search for truth amid disturbing allegations that arise in an Ethiopian children’s circus. Claire’s Head combines mystery and neurology in the story of two sisters linked by their experience of migraines. In The Rules of Engagement, a contemporary woman contends with the psychological aftermath of a duel fought over her, and in Minus Time, the daughter of a Canadian astronaut confronts the strangeness of having a mother in space.

Bush’s nonfiction has appeared in numerous publications including the Globe and Mail, The New York Times Magazine, the literary magazine Brick, and the anthology, The Heart Does Break (2009).  For five years in the mid-1980’s, she wrote about dance and performance, freelanced for a running magazine, ghost-authored a romance novel about anthropomorphic bears, wrote two YA biographies, and ran a successful reading series in New York City.

Currently the Coordinator of the Creative Writing MFA at the University of Guelph, she taught Creative Writing at Concordia University in Montreal from 1997-99, and in 2001 was a visiting writer at the University of Florida. She has also taught for the Humber School for Writers, in UBC’s low-residency Creative Writing MFA, and for the Summer Literary Seminars in Kenya.  She has been a fellow at the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and Writer-in-Residence at universities including the University of Alberta, Guelph, McMaster, and the University of New Brunswick.

She lives in Toronto and is at work on a new novel.

“Fairy tales are almost always the stories of the powerless, of youngest sons, abandoned children, orphans.... Fairy tales are children's stories not in who they were made for but in their focus on the early stages of life, when others have power over you and you have power over no one.”

— Rebecca Solnit, The Faraway Nearby